Hypnotic Patterns - Learn to use Hypnotic Language Patterns

       

How to learn Hypnotic Patterns

The key with learning hypnotic language patterns is to master each hypnotic pattern individually through repetition, and the best way to do this is to write out example after example. The use of multiple patterns will become automatic once you have a reasonable amount of practice and start to try out a few inductions.

For instance if I wanted to learn how to use the cause and effect pattern, I would write out pages and pages of examples all based around my planned use for the pattern. So if I want to learn to use cause and effect as part of a hypnotic induction I would write examples as follows:

  • As you notice your breathing you can begin to relax
  • Your eyelids become heavy and you feel the need to blink
  • You can feel your weight in the chair as you continue to breathe deeply

You may also notice in writing out hypnotic patterns in this way that you automatically bring in other language patterns without thinking about it. In all three examples above, the second part of the sentence is an embedded command, and the first pattern also contains the word begin - which is part of the Subordinate Clauses of Time category of presuppositions.

What order should I learn the hypnotic patterns?

If you don't know the patterns already, then the previous section has probably confused you completely, but don't worry. Firstly, you do not need all the milton model patterns to perform a hypnotic induction - some are much more useful than others, so you should concentrate on those.

Firstly, its worth understanding the concept of pacing and leading. This will help you to understand the aim of the hypnotic patterns and give you a purpose to each statement. One key to pacing and leading is the use of Linkage / Casual Modeling or Cause/Effect patterns, so this is the best place to start. Imagine you've got a client sat in front of you, and write out loads of examples of cause effect statements that you could use as part of an induction using lots of pacing and leading along with embedded commands:

  • As you notice your breathing you can begin to relax
  • Your eyelids become heavy and you feel the need to blink
  • You can feel your weight in the chair as you continue to breathe deeply
  • You may notice the sounds in the room as you feel your weight in the chair and you begin to relax
  • The more you listen to the sound of my voice, the more you will relax deeply

While working on pacing and leading, its easy to add in statements that use Lost Performatives. Statements such as:

  • I don't know whether you're going to relax
  • It's good that you can feel comfortable
  • At some point you may begin to feel sleepy

As with cause and effect, lost performatives work well with embedded commands.

It this point you may want to read up on presuppositiions, because many of your examples will probably be full of them.

Phrases such as Would you prefer to close your eyes while you relax - presupposes that the client will relax. and Before you relax could you take off your shoes - presupposes that the client will relax when they take their shoes off. These are good examples, but if you go through your written examples you fill find they are full of assumptions about what the client will do.

Once you have these hypnotic patterns under your belt the look through the rest of the milton model language patterns and work out a few examples and see how they fit into your way of working.

Some hypnotists use few hypnotic language patterns, relying on relaxation inductions and delivering instructions to the client as in a normal conversation. As well as being hugely effective, using the milton model is much more fun.

       

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